JSSM  Vol.2 No.4 , December 2009
The Development of Services in Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Environment from ‘Technology’ Perspective
ABSTRACT
The service sector is receiving much deserved attention resulting from its inevitable role in a country’s economic de-velopment. Despite all the efforts gaps such as the relationship between technological advances and service development are yet to be revealed from the perspective of new applications that organizations want to develop and implement. This paper explores opportunities using a comprehensive model (and CRM, as an example) that can be used to extend the research relating service development to the technology development aspects of the market.

Cite this paper
nullG. K. Agrawal and D. Berg, "The Development of Services in Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Environment from ‘Technology’ Perspective," Journal of Service Science and Management, Vol. 2 No. 4, 2009, pp. 432-438. doi: 10.4236/jssm.2009.24052.
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