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 AJIBM  Vol.10 No.3 , March 2020
Peer Trainers Are Change Agents as Well as Instructors: Promoting Safety and Health in the Workplace
Abstract: Peer trainers from across the country, who worked on road crews, in hospitals, in prisons, and in chemical facilities, themselves brought positive safety and health changes to their workplaces. Through advanced instruction, at the International Chemical Workers Union Council (ICWUC) Center for Worker Health and Safety Education (the Center), they not only learned how to be health and safety instructors, but they also became change agents by responding to questions on the shop floor and taking actions to improve safety and health for themselves and for their fellow workers.
Cite this paper: Ruttenberg, R. , Dudley, D. and Morawetz, J. (2020) Peer Trainers Are Change Agents as Well as Instructors: Promoting Safety and Health in the Workplace. American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, 10, 677-688. doi: 10.4236/ajibm.2020.103045.
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