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 OJCE  Vol.9 No.4 , December 2019
Environmental and Cost Advantages of Using Polyethylene Terephthalate Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Fly Ash as a Partial Cement Replacement
Abstract: Solid waste disposal is an alarming problem in most African countries. Plastic wastes like Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottles and powdered wastes like fly ash are severely persisting environmental hazards. They are brutally polluting the water bodies, landfills, as well as the atmosphere. The construction industry has been working towards improving concrete quality by developing alternative methods like partial cement replacement with different pozzolanic elements as well as using waste fibrous materials. Fly ash and PET bottle fibres are two common waste materials that can be used. This article is a part of a research that studied the combined effects of the addition of PET bottle fibres and fly ash (as a partial cement replacement) on the structural performance of concrete. From a purely engineering point of view, the research results indicate that the utilization and incorporation of PET and fly ash wastes in the construction industry are a viable solution to make concrete quality better. This article presents, beyond the engineering properties and experimental works, the economic and environmental advantages of the addition of these waste materials to the conventional concrete mixture. The addition of PET bottle fibres and fly ash resulted in positive cost implications providing a production cost reduction of 19% over the conventional concrete mixture. The removal of these materials from the environment also showed reduction of the emission of toxic elements to landfills and water bodies that put human, animal and plant lives in danger.
Cite this paper: Kassa, R. , Kanali, C. and Ambassah, N. (2019) Environmental and Cost Advantages of Using Polyethylene Terephthalate Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Fly Ash as a Partial Cement Replacement. Open Journal of Civil Engineering, 9, 281-290. doi: 10.4236/ojce.2019.94020.
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