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 OJAS  Vol.9 No.2 , April 2019
Extruded Corn Meal as a Partial Replacement for Steam Flaked Corn in Finishing Diets for Feedlot Cattle: Growth Performance and Digestive Function of Feedlot Cattle
Abstract: Sixty-four Holstein steers (247 ± 4 kg) were used in a 70-d experiment to evaluate the effects of partial replacement of steam flake corn (SFC) with extruded corn meal (EC) on growth performance and dietary net energy. Treatments consisted of a steam flaked corn-based finishing diet containing 0%, 10%, 20%, or 30% EC, where EC replaced 0%, 15%, 30%, or 45% of SFC (DM basis). Replacement of SFC with increasing levels of EC did not affect (P > 0.10) ADG, DMI, and gain efficiency. When EC replaced 15% to 30% of SFC, observed dietary NE was 99% of expected. Whereas, when EC replaced 45% of SFC, observed dietary NE was 94% of expected. Four Holstein steers (210 ± 7 kg) with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experiment to evaluate treatment effects on characteristics of digestion. Partial replacement of SFC with EC did not affect (P > 0.10) flow of undegraded feed N and microbial N and to the small intestine, and ruminal microbial N efficiency (g microbial N/kg OM fermented). Likewise, there were no treatment effects (P > 0.10) on ruminal digestion of OM, NDF, starch and feed N. As expected, total tract digestion of starch for all treatments exceeded 99%. However, partial replacement of SFC with EC decreased total tract digestion of DM and OM (linear effect, P = 0.02), and dietary DE (linear effect, P = 0.03). These effects were more pronounced where EC replaced 45% of SFC. Partial replacement of SFC with EC did not affect (P > 0.10) ruminal pH, total VFA concentration, molar proportions of acetate, propionate, and butyrate, and estimated methane production. It is concluded that partial replacement of SFC with EC does not have a beneficial effect on ruminal microbial efficiency and digestive function. The feeding value of extruded corn for feedlot cattle is comparable to that of steam flaked corn provided the inclusion rate does not exceed 20% of diet dry matter.
Cite this paper: Buenabad, L. , Jacinto, A. , Montano, M. and Zinn, R. (2019) Extruded Corn Meal as a Partial Replacement for Steam Flaked Corn in Finishing Diets for Feedlot Cattle: Growth Performance and Digestive Function of Feedlot Cattle. Open Journal of Animal Sciences, 9, 196-206. doi: 10.4236/ojas.2019.92017.
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