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 JWARP  Vol.10 No.9 , September 2018
GWAM—An Institutional Model to Address Watershed Impacts from Urbanization: Field Validation
Abstract: With the realization of the limitations to top-down and bottom-up watershed management approaches in addressing issues associated with urbanization, a conceptual framework for a hybrid approach that tries to effectively integrate the advantages of the two approaches while overcoming their respective limitations, grass root watershed management model (GWAM), was proposed and presented. This paper presents the details of implementation and validation of GWAM at Shawsheen River watershed in Massachusetts, USA. An investigation on the major components of GWAM, a common platform to conduct the management, a partnership of two major stakeholder groups from government and non-governmental organizations, and a facilitation mechanisms were carried out in detail to gain the needed understanding on structure, process and function of a successful GWAM. Also the decision making process in addressing three major urban watershed issues; flooding, habitat and aquatic life impairment, and bacterial impairment, were examined through a set of cyclic steps. Based on the lessons learned, GWAM was enhanced as a general hybrid model. The most important challenge in sustaining GWAM was to keep differently motivated stakeholders together. As revealed in the Shawsheen watershed, science should play a key role in keeping differently motivated stakeholders together by providing needed facts, understandings, data, and knowledge. When scientifically sound solutions are vetted through a process of public involvement that supports appropriate regulatory actions, the most effective environmental decisions can be made.
Cite this paper: Saravanapavan, T. and Yamaji, E. (2018) GWAM—An Institutional Model to Address Watershed Impacts from Urbanization: Field Validation. Journal of Water Resource and Protection, 10, 906-918. doi: 10.4236/jwarp.2018.109053.
References

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https://doi.org/10.4236/jwarp.2018.109052

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