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 IJCM  Vol.9 No.1 , January 2018
Effects of Intraocular Lens Implantation without Viscoelastic Agents on Corneal Endothelial Cells
Abstract: Objective: To determine the protective effects of intraocular lens implantation without viscoelastic agents on corneal endothelial cells. Methods: Patients with age-related cataract were randomly divided into two groups: Group A (24 patients, 30 eyes) underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation without viscoelastic agents, and group B (21 patients, 30 eyes) underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation with viscoelastic agents. The corneal endothelial cell counts, percentages of hexagonal cells, and central corneal thicknesses were evaluated at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months after surgery. Results: There was no significant difference in preoperative basic characteristics between the two groups (p > 0.05). The postoperative corneal endothelial cell count and percentage of hexagonal cells in both groups decreased compared with preoperative values at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months after surgery, and the decrease of group A was significantly lower than that of group B at all time points (p < 0.05). The central cornea thickness in both groups increased at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months after surgery, and there were no significant difference in the change of central cornea thickness between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Compared with regular intraocular lens implantation, intraocular lens implantation without viscoelastic agents is less damaging to corneal endothelial cells, resulting in greater corneal safety.
Cite this paper: Wang, H. , Song, X. , Yang, H. , Li, Q. , Hu, C. and Qi, S. (2018) Effects of Intraocular Lens Implantation without Viscoelastic Agents on Corneal Endothelial Cells. International Journal of Clinical Medicine, 9, 1-7. doi: 10.4236/ijcm.2018.91001.
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