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 OJCE  Vol.7 No.1 , March 2017
Compressive Strength and Abrasion Resistance of Concretes under Varying Exposure Conditions
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to comparatively evaluate the wear resistance of concretes under abrasion rates. Five concrete mix proportions of a fixed water-cement ratio of 0.45 were considered in the study, but the constituent materials, age of concrete and exposure contact conditions were varied. The coarse aggregate type employed in the study was crushed granite. The compressive strength and abrasion resistance of concretes were tested between at ages 7 to 70 days and 100 - 500 revolutions of abrasion wheels respectively. The study revealed that the compressive strength and abrasion resistance had the optimal performance when the coarse aggregate content was 45% and the worst performance when the fine aggregate content was 28.7% of the total weight of concrete constituents. There was a remarkable loss of concrete particles to wear between 200 revs and 300 revs of abrasion wheel contact. Concrete grade in excess of 60 N/mm2 is required to resist abrasion beyond 200 revolutions of abrasion wheel contact on concrete specimens. Concretes investigated also showed weak resistance to deep abrasion at and above 300 revolutions of abrasion wheel contact.
Cite this paper: Adewuyi, A. , Sulaiman, I. and Akinyele, J. (2017) Compressive Strength and Abrasion Resistance of Concretes under Varying Exposure Conditions. Open Journal of Civil Engineering, 7, 82-99. doi: 10.4236/ojce.2017.71005.
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