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 AiM  Vol.6 No.9 , August 2016
Evolution of Antimicrobial, Antioxidant Potentials and Phytochemical Studies of Three Solvent Extracts of Five Species from Acacia Used in Sudanese Ethnomedicine
Abstract: The ethanol, chloroform and acetone extracts of five species from Acacia (Acacia albidia stems, Acacia mellifera aerial parts, Acacia nubica aerial parts, Acacia seyal var. seyal stems and Acacia tortilis aerial parts) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against two standard bacterial strains of Gram +ve bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923)), Gram -ve bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853)) and standard fungi Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) using the agar-plate well diffusion method. The chloroform extract was inactive compared to ethanol and acetone extracts. But ethanol extracts showed the maximum antimicrobial activity against the test organism. Amongst the plant species screened, ethanol extract of Acacia seyal stems showed maximum inhibitory activity (38 mm) and (37 mm) against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, respectively. The ethanol, chloroform and acetone extracts of Acacia mellifera (aerial parts) did not show any activity against the test organisms. Cholorophorm and acetone extracts via DPPH, the radical scavenging activities were found to be 91 ± 0.03, 88 ± 0.01 and 85 ± 0.04, respectively. The results of phytochemical screening showed that all extracts of studied plant contain flavonoids, saponins, terpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, phenols and tannins.
Cite this paper: Abdllha, H. , Mohamed, A. , Almoniem, K. , Adam, N. , Alhaadi, W. , Elshikh, A. , Ali, A. , Makuar, I. , Elnazeer, A. , Elrofaei, N. , Abdoelftah, S. and Hemidan, M. (2016) Evolution of Antimicrobial, Antioxidant Potentials and Phytochemical Studies of Three Solvent Extracts of Five Species from Acacia Used in Sudanese Ethnomedicine. Advances in Microbiology, 6, 691-698. doi: 10.4236/aim.2016.69068.
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