CE  Vol.2 No.3 , August 2011
A Survey of Social Support and Coping Style in Middle School Female Teachers in China
Author(s) Ping Wang, Qiong Dai
ABSTRACT
Objective: It is hypothesized that social support and different coping would make a difference in people’s health. This paper attempts to investigate social support and coping in middle school female teachers in Wuhan, China. Methods: 1:2 case-control matched study. 300 female teachers as case group, 300 matched male teachers as control group 1 and another 300 matched female workers as another control group. Results: Female teachers got significantly lower score on positive coping and higher negative coping than male teachers. However, they got significantly higher score on positive coping and lower negative coping than female workers (P < 0.05 respectively). Female teachers scored significantly lower than male teachers but higher than female workers on total score of social support, objective and subjective support and utility degree of social support (P < 0.05 respectively). There were no significant differences between female teachers from senior and junior middle schools on coping and social support (P > 0.05 respectively). The female teachers from key senior and junior middle schools got significantly higher score on positive coping and social support than those from non-key middle schools (P < 0.05 respectively). There were no significant differences between female teachers on negative coping from key and non-key senior and junior middle schools (P > 0.05 respectively). The female teachers with a higher title and professional qualification got significantly lower score on negative coping and higher score on positive coping and social support than female teachers with a lower title and professional qualification and female workers (P < 0.05 respectively). The female teachers with master and bachelor degree got significantly lower score on negative coping and higher score on subjective support and utility degree of social support than those without a degree (P < 0.05 respectively). Conclusion: The impact of social support and coping showed significant differences for female teachers of different school, professional and education level.

Cite this paper
nullWang, P. and Dai, Q. (2011) A Survey of Social Support and Coping Style in Middle School Female Teachers in China. Creative Education, 2, 220-225. doi: 10.4236/ce.2011.23030.
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