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 Health  Vol.8 No.3 , February 2016
Comparison of Contraceptive Methods Chosen by Breastfeeding, and Non-Breastfeeding, Women at a Family Planning Clinic in Northern Nigeria
Abstract: Introduction: Breast feeding may pose a further challenge to uptake of contraception by possibly restricting use of certain methods for real or perceived risks of side effects. Methodology: A retrospective study was done at the Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital, Kaduna. Available family planning clinic client cards from January 1st, 2000 to March 31st, 2014 were retrieved and information collected on demographics, reproductive and menstrual history, contraceptive choices and breast feeding status. Data were analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 15. Missing responses were stated and excluded from analysis. Chi square was used as a test of association with significance level established at p value, 0.05. Results: A total number of 5992 client cards were retrieved. All clients were female and married, and majority of clients aged between 25 - 34 years (53.1%), had either completed their secondary education or gone further (56%) and were Muslims (52.3%). Only 2924 women stated that they were currently breastfeeding (48.8%), 1828 women were not breastfeeding (30.5%) and 1240 women (20.7%) did not state their breastfeeding status. Younger and more educated women were more likely to be breastfeeding than older women and less educated ones (p < 0.05). Only 4636 cards (77%) had correctly filled data on the choice of contraceptives chosen by breastfeeding status with 2854 women breast feeding and 1302 (45.6%) chose injectable hormonal contraception, 888 (31.1%) chose intrauterine contraceptive devices, 484 (17%) chose oral contraceptive pills and 180 (6.3%) chose contraceptive implants. There was no record of condom use or use of permanent methods of contraception. Conclusion: Breastfeeding rates were high among women seeking contraception. The pattern of contraception is similar among both breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding women, with injectable contraception being the preferred choice. Awareness should be raised on the safety of a wider variety of contraception available for breastfeeding women.
Cite this paper: Mohammed-Durosinlorun, A. , Abubakar, A. , Adze, J. , Bature, S. , Mohammed, C. , Taingson, M. and Ojabo, A. (2016) Comparison of Contraceptive Methods Chosen by Breastfeeding, and Non-Breastfeeding, Women at a Family Planning Clinic in Northern Nigeria. Health, 8, 191-197. doi: 10.4236/health.2016.83022.
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