ABC  Vol.5 No.7 , December 2015
The Profile of Secondary Metabolites of Sponge Clathria reinwardtii Extract as a Result of Fe Accumulation in Spermonde Archipelago
ABSTRACT
Study on the effect of Fe metal concentrations in Spermonde Archipelago on secondary metabolites production from sponge was conducted. The percent of peak area and m/z from GC-MS at tR = 13.555 were affected by accumulated Fe in Chlathria reinwardtii, where at high Fe concentration a lower percent peak area was produced compared to Clathria rein-wardtii extract at low Fe concentration. Chromatogram CR-LL-DCM produced 2 peaks at tR = 21.401 and 25.174 which were not observed in CR-BC-DCM chromatogram. This indicated that Clathria reinwardtii in Lae-Lae island produced metabolite secondary compounds that were not produced by Clahtria reinwardtii in Barrang Caddi island. FT-IR analysis indicated that Clathria reinwardtii accumulating Fe with highest and lowest concentration produced strong peaks at wavenumber of about 3400 cm-1 for O-H and N-H stretches. O-H pliable and C-O stretch peaks at wavenumber of about 1200 cm-1 had changes from medium intensity at low Fe concentration (CR-BC-DCM) to weak at high Fe concentration (CR-LL-DCM).

Cite this paper
Melawaty, L. and Pasau, K. (2015) The Profile of Secondary Metabolites of Sponge Clathria reinwardtii Extract as a Result of Fe Accumulation in Spermonde Archipelago. Advances in Biological Chemistry, 5, 266-272. doi: 10.4236/abc.2015.57023.
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