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 ABC  Vol.5 No.7 , December 2015
The Profile of Secondary Metabolites of Sponge Clathria reinwardtii Extract as a Result of Fe Accumulation in Spermonde Archipelago
Abstract: Study on the effect of Fe metal concentrations in Spermonde Archipelago on secondary metabolites production from sponge was conducted. The percent of peak area and m/z from GC-MS at tR = 13.555 were affected by accumulated Fe in Chlathria reinwardtii, where at high Fe concentration a lower percent peak area was produced compared to Clathria rein-wardtii extract at low Fe concentration. Chromatogram CR-LL-DCM produced 2 peaks at tR = 21.401 and 25.174 which were not observed in CR-BC-DCM chromatogram. This indicated that Clathria reinwardtii in Lae-Lae island produced metabolite secondary compounds that were not produced by Clahtria reinwardtii in Barrang Caddi island. FT-IR analysis indicated that Clathria reinwardtii accumulating Fe with highest and lowest concentration produced strong peaks at wavenumber of about 3400 cm-1 for O-H and N-H stretches. O-H pliable and C-O stretch peaks at wavenumber of about 1200 cm-1 had changes from medium intensity at low Fe concentration (CR-BC-DCM) to weak at high Fe concentration (CR-LL-DCM).
Cite this paper: Melawaty, L. and Pasau, K. (2015) The Profile of Secondary Metabolites of Sponge Clathria reinwardtii Extract as a Result of Fe Accumulation in Spermonde Archipelago. Advances in Biological Chemistry, 5, 266-272. doi: 10.4236/abc.2015.57023.
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