MSA  Vol.6 No.12 , December 2015
Anatomical Properties of Three Lesser Utilised Ghanaian Hardwood Species
ABSTRACT
Wood is composed of mostly hollow, elongated, spindle-shaped cells that are arranged parallel to each other along the trunk of a tree. The characteristics of these fibrous cells and their arrangement affect strength properties, appearance, resistance to penetration by water and chemical solutions, resistance to decay and many other properties. The characterisation of wood helps in identifying them. In this work, we studied the anatomical properties of three lesser utilised Ghanaian hardwood species namely Albizia ferruginea (Guill. & Perr.) Benth, Blighia sapida K. D. Koenig and Sterculia rhinopetala K. Schum using the light microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Anatomical features studied were fiber length, double fiber wall thickness, fiber proportion, vessel diameter and proportion, rays and axial parenchyma proportions. We observed that the use of SEM in studying the anatomical or ultra-structural aspects of wood gave a clearer understanding of the features and structures found in wood. Anatomical features such as presence of crystals and absence of axial parenchyma in Blighia sapida and the thick wall fibers of Sterculia rhinopetala were better understood.

Cite this paper
Quartey, G. (2015) Anatomical Properties of Three Lesser Utilised Ghanaian Hardwood Species. Materials Sciences and Applications, 6, 1111-1120. doi: 10.4236/msa.2015.612110.
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