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 JEP  Vol.6 No.8 , August 2015
Indoor Air Quality Real-Time Monitoring Results of Pathology Department
Abstract: In this work, the objectives were to provide a scientific basis for environmental governance and to ensure staff health by real-time monitoring of indoor air quality of the pathology department. Using eagle eye environment monitor to make a real-time dynamic monitoring of the air quality of the pathological technical room for 30 days, the paper records the monitoring data of PM 2.5, PM 10, formaldehyde, CO2, total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) every day at Beijing time 3 a.m, 10 am, 1 pm, 4 pm, and 10 pm, and makes a summarization and analysis. The average value of CO2 concentration of the 5 time points is (0.05 ± 0.01)%, and each time point concentration are different (P < 0.05), of which the concentration at 10 am, 4 pm are significantly higher than other time points (P < 0.05), especially the 1 pm, which is different with every other time points (P < 0.05); the average value of formaldehyde concentration of the 5 time points is (1.32 ± 0.86) mg/m3, and each time point concentration is different (P < 0.05), of which the concentration at 10 am, 1 pm are significantly lower than other time points (P < 0.05). There is no significant difference between the concentration at 10 am and 1 pm; the average value of PM 10 concentration of the 5 time points is (40.72 ± 41.76) mg/m3, and each time point concentration is different (P < 0.05), of which the concentration at 10 am, 4 pm are significantly higher than other time points (P < 0.05), and the concentration at 1 pm is different with every other time point, while the differences are with statistical significance (P < 0.05); the average CO concentration of the 5 time points is (3.25 ± 1.44) mg/m3, and there is no obvious difference between each other (P > 0.05); the average TVOC concentration of the 5 time points is (0.08 + 0.31) mg/m3. They are all different between the concentration at each time point (P < 0.05), of which that of 4 pm is significantly higher than other time points (P < 0.05); SO2 and NO are not checked out. Through the real-time online monitoring of the pathology room, we find that the formaldehyde concentration of different time periods is far more than the safety value standard, and the concentration of formaldehyde, CO2, PM 2.5, PM 10 and total volatile organic compound (TVOC) is different at different time periods, and the concentrations at working time are higher than the non-working time. We must take effective measures to control the concentration of harmful gases in order to ensure the staff’s health.
Cite this paper: Shi, L. , Wang, Y. , Xu, L. , Liu, Y. , Yao, D. , Li, X. and Jia, Y. (2015) Indoor Air Quality Real-Time Monitoring Results of Pathology Department. Journal of Environmental Protection, 6, 851-856. doi: 10.4236/jep.2015.68077.
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