PSYCH  Vol.6 No.8 , June 2015
Effects of Administrative Climate and Interpersonal Climate in University on Teachers’ Mental Health
Author(s) Xiaofu Pan1, Zebing Wu2
ABSTRACT
A self-made questionnaire was used to test the influence of university administrative and interpersonal climate to teachers’ mental health. 826 teachers were stratified randomly from 20 universities across China, and the survey data of samples were analyzed by correlation analysis and hierarchical regression analysis. The results show that the administrative and interpersonal climate in universities is one significantly positive predicting variable of the teachers’ mental health. The study finds out that administrators and educational practitioners should strengthen the construction of soft power in universities, such as promoting the culture and positive organizational climate, building up good administrative and interpersonal climate, so as to promote teachers’ mental health development.

Cite this paper
Pan, X. and Wu, Z. (2015) Effects of Administrative Climate and Interpersonal Climate in University on Teachers’ Mental Health. Psychology, 6, 1029-1039. doi: 10.4236/psych.2015.68100.
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