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 LCE  Vol.2 No.2 , June 2011
Energy Efficiency Regulation and R&D Activity:A Study of the Top Runner Program in Japan
Abstract: The Top Runner Program, a new approach to enhancing the energy efficiency of appliances and vehicles, has been in-troduced in Japan. In this paper an empirical analysis of the impact of the program and the labeling systems on firms’ R&D efforts is carried out. The results show that the Top Runner Program and the labeling system for appliances led to increases in R&D expenditures by appliance producers. The program combined with the labeling system caused a 9.5% increase in appliance producers’ R&D expenditures. However, the Top Runner Program and the labeling system for motor vehicles had little or even a negative effect on the innovative activity of motor vehicle manufacturers. R&D ex-penditures by motor vehicle producers may have increased in response to the exhaust gas regulation for diesel-powered vehicles rather than the energy efficiency regulation.
Cite this paper: nullM. Hamamoto, "Energy Efficiency Regulation and R&D Activity:A Study of the Top Runner Program in Japan," Low Carbon Economy, Vol. 2 No. 2, 2011, pp. 91-98. doi: 10.4236/lce.2011.22012.
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