OJMM  Vol.4 No.4 , December 2014
Staphylococcus aureus Can Produce Catalase Enzyme When Adding to Human WBCs as a Source of H2O2 Productions in Human Plasma or Serum in the Laboratory
ABSTRACT
Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most virulent gram positive bacteria. It produces a lot of toxins and enzymes, most of which are virulent factors. Among the enzyme that produces is the catalase which is very useful in differentiating staphylococci from streptococci [1]. Catalase is nearly ubiquitous among some of organisms that can grow in the presence of oxygen (air). It promotes the conversion of hydrogen peroxide, a powerful and potentially harmful oxidizing agent, to water and molecular oxygen; so the major function of catalase within cells is to prevent the accumulation of toxic levels of hydrogen peroxide formed as a by-product of metabolic processes—primarily that of the electron transport pathway. Objectives: The main aim of this study is to prove that human WBCs can produce H2O2. This H2O2 when reacting with catalase producing S. aureus can easily be degraded to H2O + O2. Methodology: In this study a total of 40 subjects were included. Aliquots of 2.5 ml of venous blood were collected by venous puncture after disinfecting the site of collection with 70% alcohol and the collected blood was drawn into EDITA containers (20 subject) and anticoagulant free containers (other 20 subject), centrifugation for 5 minute at 1500 RPM. The separated sera and plasma were converted to new sterile eppendrof tubes and freezing until used (we leaved the eppendrof tubes that contained sera and plasma at room temperature before using it for DE freezing). Standard catalase producing S. aureus were used by taking 1 colony from Macconkey media by using applicator wooden stick, and inserted in eppendrof tube, then air bubbles would appear to indicate occurrence of the reactions. Results: According to this study, it was proved that WBCs in human plasma or serum can produce H2O2; this H2O2 was reacted with catalase enzyme produce from colony of S. aureus to produce air bubbles and water. There were no differences between using H2O2 or human plasma/serum that contains WBCs to detect and identify S. aureus by both techniques. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, we can use WBCs that are found in human plasma or serum to identify catalase producing S. aureus.

Cite this paper
Mustafa, H. (2014) Staphylococcus aureus Can Produce Catalase Enzyme When Adding to Human WBCs as a Source of H2O2 Productions in Human Plasma or Serum in the Laboratory. Open Journal of Medical Microbiology, 4, 249-251. doi: 10.4236/ojmm.2014.44028.
References
[1]   Brooks, G.F., Butel, J.S. and Morse, S.A. (2004) The Staphylococci. In: Brooks, G.F., Butel, J.S. and Morse, S.A., Eds., Jawetz, Melnick & Adelberg’s Medical Microbiology, 23rd Edition, McGraw-Hill Companies, New York, 223, 225-227.

[2]   Brooks, G.F, Butel, J.S. and Morse, S.A. (2004) Cultivation of Microorganisms. In: Brooks, G.F., Butel, J.S. and Morse, S.A., Eds., Jawetz, Melnick & Adelberg’s Medical Microbiology, 23rd Edition, McGraw-Hill Companies, New York, 62-64, 66.

[3]   Reiner, K. (2012) Catalase Test Protocol.

[4]   Cheesbrough, M. (2004) Catalase Test. In: Cheesbrough, M., Ed., District Laboratory Practice in Tropical Countries, Part 2, Low Price Egyptian Edition 2004, the Anglo-Egyptian Bookshop, Egypt, 64-65.

 
 
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