JGIS  Vol.6 No.6 , December 2014
Landslide Hazard Mapping of Nagadhunga-Naubise Section of the Tribhuvan Highway in Nepal with GIS Application
ABSTRACT
The aim of this project was to prepare and study a hazard map of Nagadhunga-Naubise section of the Tribhuvan highway. This section lies in the Middle Mountain region of Nepal. For the preparation of the hazard map of the corridor three steps, initial study, field investigation, and data analysis and presentation were carried out. In the initial study, the collection of available data and review of the literature were done. The base map was then prepared from the topographical map. In the field investigation step, all information and maps prepared earlier in the initial study were verified by field check. In the final step, prepared and verified data were then analyzed for the hazard mapping. Topography (gradient, slope shape and slope aspect), geology, drainage and land-use were considered to be the major influencing factors in the slope stability. Pre-assigned hazard rating method was used for hazard mapping of the study area. The area was divided into equal facets. Then ratings of responsible factors to the hazard were assigned to each facet and overlaid based upon a predetermined rating scheme. Total estimated hazard was the sum of these ratings for each overlay. Hazard map was prepared by using three categories as low hazard, medium hazard and high hazard. The Geographic Information System (GIS) was the main tool for the data input, analysis, and preparing of the final hazard map. The hazard map showed the areas of different hazard potential classes of; “low” with 32% portion, “Medium” with 51%, and “high” with 17% portion.

Cite this paper
Pandey, A. and Shahbodaghlou, F. (2014) Landslide Hazard Mapping of Nagadhunga-Naubise Section of the Tribhuvan Highway in Nepal with GIS Application. Journal of Geographic Information System, 6, 723-732. doi: 10.4236/jgis.2014.66059.
References
[1]   Tianchi, L., Chalise, S.R. and Upreti, B.N. (2001) Landslide Hazard Mitigation in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas. International Center for Integrated Mountain Development, Kathmandu.

[2]   Wagner, A. (2000) Slope Stability Mapping of the Chandisthan Sub-Watershed, a Catchment Area of the Marsyangdi River. Halvetas/Swiss Technical Corporation Nepal, Kathmandu.

[3]   Ghimire, M. (2002) Geo-Hydrological Processes and Their Impact on the Environment and Socio-Economy of a Watershed Mountain Development, Kathmandu, Nepal. International Center for Integrated Mountain Development, Kathmandu.

[4]   Deoja, B., Dhatal, M., Thapa, B. and Wagner, A. (1991) Mountain Risk Engineering Handbook Part I—Subject Background. International Center for Integrated Mountain Development, Kathmandu.

[5]   Deoja, B., Dhatal, M., Thapa, B. and Wagner, A. (1991) Mountain Risk Engineering Handbook Part II—Application. International Center for Integrated Mountain Development, Kathmandu.

[6]   Deoja, B., Dhatal, M., Thapa, B. and Wagner, A. (1991) Risk Engineering in the Hind Kush—Himalaya. International Center for Integrated Mountain Development, Kathmandu.

[7]   Department of Water Induced Disaster Prevention, Government of Nepal (2004) Report of Photo Monitoring in Kathmandu-Naubise Road. Kathmandu.

[8]   Ministry of Home (2003) Annual Report. Kathmandu.

[9]   Moser, M. (2002) Geotechnical aspects of landslides in the Alps. In: Rybár, J., Stemberk, J. and Wagner, P., Eds., Landslides, 24-26 June 2002, A.A. Balkema, Prague, 23-44.

[10]   Sarkar, S., Kanungo, D.P. and Mehrotra, G.S. (1995) Landslide Hazard Zonation: A Case Study in Garhwal Himalaya, India. Mountain Research and Development, 15, 301-309.

[11]   Schuster, R.L. and Fleming, R.W. (1986) Economic Losses and Fatalities due to Landslides. Bulletin of Association of Geologists, 23, 11-28.

[12]   Sharma, C.K. (1988) Natural Hazards and Man Made Impacts in Nepal Himalaya. Puspha Sharma Publication, Kathmandu.

 
 
Top