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 JCDSA  Vol.4 No.5 , December 2014
Combination (5% Hydroquinone, 0.1% Tretinoin and 1% Hydrocortisone) Cream in Treating Facial Hyperpigmentation: A Retrospective Patient Satisfaction Survey
Abstract: Background: Melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation provide a significant source of psychosocial morbidity, especially in those with Fitzpatrick skin types III-VI. In Europe, a proprietary product aimed at treating these conditions, similar to Kligman’s formula but with a longer expiry date, has become available. Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction with a newly available combination de-pigmenting preparation. Methods: We conducted a small study to see if patients felt that this new product affected their quality of life and skin symptoms from hyperpigmentation. 41 subjects, who had all been prescribed a 15 g tube to use sparingly at night for 90 days within the last 12 months were telephoned to rate the effect the cream had on their quality of life and skin symptom improvement. Each patient also had their Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score assessed. Results: Out of the 29 patients who responded to the study, 22 had melasma and 7 had post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation from acne. 21 subjects felt that the cream made either a marked or moderate improvement on their quality of life and 23 subjects felt that the cream made either a marked or moderate improvement on their skin symptoms. Conclusion: Patients reported improvement in both hyperpigmentation and quality of life, suggesting a high level of satisfaction with treatment. The long shelf life of the product may also promote compliance and reduce health-care costs.
Cite this paper: Fleming, J. and Bashir, S. (2014) Combination (5% Hydroquinone, 0.1% Tretinoin and 1% Hydrocortisone) Cream in Treating Facial Hyperpigmentation: A Retrospective Patient Satisfaction Survey. Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications, 4, 329-331. doi: 10.4236/jcdsa.2014.45043.
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