JSS  Vol.2 No.11 , November 2014
Publication Patterns in 3 Prominent Educational Psychology Journals: The Geography of Editors, Advisors, Authors, and Participants
Author(s) Steven R. Yussen*
ABSTRACT

This article considers the publication practices of 3 leading journals in Educational Psychology, for the 6-year period 2008-2013, to determine their representation of countries throughout the world among the editors, editorial board members, authors, and the participants in the samples (the samples of participants based on a random subset of the articles published). The journals considered are: 1) Journal of Educational Psychology (JEP); 2) Contemporary Educational Psychology (CEP); and 3) The British Journal of Educational Psychology (BJEP). The journals published in the United States (JEP and CEP) have a 50 - 60 percent focus on individuals and participants in the United States. For BJEP, the United Kingdom accounts for about a third of authors and participants. Significantly more non-English speaking European countries are represented in the BJEP than in the two American journals. In all three countries, Asia, Africa, and Central and South America are significantly under-represented in the authors and participants of studies.


Cite this paper
Yussen, S. (2014) Publication Patterns in 3 Prominent Educational Psychology Journals: The Geography of Editors, Advisors, Authors, and Participants. Open Journal of Social Sciences, 2, 68-72. doi: 10.4236/jss.2014.211009.
References
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