Back
 OJPP  Vol.4 No.4 , November 2014
Do We Have an Inborn Moral Sense?
Abstract: This paper reviews some recent work in the relationship between caring behavior among humans, an evolutionary adaptation necessary for survival of the species, and our moral sense of right and wrong. The investigation presents some of our current understandings; the question is part of ongoing work in neuroscience and evolutionary biology. Does caring behavior necessarily imply a moral sensibility?
Cite this paper: Walker, M. (2014) Do We Have an Inborn Moral Sense?. Open Journal of Philosophy, 4, 605-612. doi: 10.4236/ojpp.2014.44062.
References

[1]   Batson, D. C. (2012). The Empathy Altruism Hypothesis: Issues and Implications. In J. Decety (Ed.), Empathy from Bench to Bedside, Cambridge: MIT Press.

[2]   Berns, G. (2008). A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently: Iconoclast. Cambridge: Harvard Business Press.

[3]   De Schrijver, J. (2009). An Evolutionary and Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective on Moral Modularity. In J. Verplaetse et al. (eds.), The Moral Brain: Essays on the Evolutionary and Neuroscientific Aspects of Morality, New York: Springer Science + Business Media.

[4]   Decety, J., & Lamm, C. (2006). Human Empathy through the Lens of Social Neuroscience. The Scientific World Journal, Ltd., 6, 1146-1163. www.thescientificworld.com.

[5]   FitzPatrick, W. (2012). Morality and Evolutionary Biology. In E. N. Zalta (Ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2012 Edition).
http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2012/entries/morality-biology/

[6]   Flanagan, O. (2002). The Problem of the Soul. New York: Basic Books.

[7]   Hatfield, E., Cacioppo, J. T., & Rapson, R. L. (1994). Emotional Contagion. Cambridge [England]: Cambridge University Press.

[8]   Moll, J., & de Oliveira-Souza, R. (2009). Extended Attachment and the Human Brain: Internalized Cultural Values and Evolutionary Implications. In J. Verplaetse et al. (Eds.), The Moral Brain: Essays on the Evolutionary and Neuroscientific Aspects of Morality, New York: Springer Science + Business Media.

[9]   Pfaff, D. W. (2007). The Neuroscience of Fair Play Why We Usually Follow the Golden Rule. New York: Dana Press

[10]   Verplaetse, J., Braeckman, J., & De Schrijver, J. (2009). Introduction. In J. Verplaetse et al. (Ed.), The Moral Brain: Essays on the Evolutionary and Neuroscientific Aspects of Morality, New York: Springer Science + Business Media.

[11]   Zahavi, D., & Overgaard, S. (2012). Empathy without Isomorphism: A Phenomenological Account. In J. Decety (Ed.), Empathy from Bench to Bedside, Cambridge: MIT Press.

 
 
Top