OJOG  Vol.4 No.14 , October 2014
Maternal and Neonatal Outcome for Singleton and Twin Pregnancies in Emergency Cesarean Section vs. Urgent Cesarean Section in a Retrospective Evaluation from 2003-2012
ABSTRACT
Objectives: Emergency cesarean is performed, when a situation requires immediate action in order to reduce the risk to mother and/or child, while urgent cesarean is done if a non-life threatening but compromising situation occurs. The aim of the study was to investigate the maternal and fetal outcome for emergency and urgent cesarean. Study Design: A retrospective case-control study was performed; cases underwent emergency cesarean section, while controls underwent urgent cesarean section. We included 303 cases of women and 336 cases of children, and controls were matched. Maternal and fetal outcome parameters for singleton and twin pregnancies were investigated using the Wilcoxon test and the Chi-square-test. Results: Maternal outcome: Higher blood loss (cases: mean 383.12 ± 232.89, range 100 - 2500 vs. controls: 336.06 ± 129.19, range 100 - 1000, p = 0.008), hemorrhage (34 vs. 11, p < 0.001) and puerperal anemia (30 vs. 10, p < 0.001). Neonatal outcome: One, five, and ten minutes Apgar levels and umbilical cord pH values are lower for cases (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Twins had lower five and ten minutes Apgar levels (p = 0.040 and 0.002), but higher umbilical cord pH values than singletons (p < 0.001). The perinatal mortality among singletons was 3.8%, among twins 8.1%. For cases the perinatal mortality among singletons was 5.7% and 17.14% for twins (control group 1.41% and 2.63%, respectively). Conclusion: The maternal and fetal outcome is poorer in emergency cesarean section. Especially the perinatal mortality is high in emergency cesarean section, particular for twins.

Cite this paper
Mölgg, A. , Jirecek, S. , Girtler, V. and Lehner, R. (2014) Maternal and Neonatal Outcome for Singleton and Twin Pregnancies in Emergency Cesarean Section vs. Urgent Cesarean Section in a Retrospective Evaluation from 2003-2012. Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 4, 881-888. doi: 10.4236/ojog.2014.414124.
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