OJMP  Vol.3 No.5 , October 2014
The Role of Attitude Strength in Predicting Organ Donation Behaviour by Implicit and Explicit Attitude Measures
ABSTRACT
Explicit attitude measures seem to be rather poor predictors of organ donation behaviour. This study examined whether implicit attitude measures acted as better predictors. Special attention was paid to the moderating role played by attitude strength in predicting deliberate donation behaviour. In this study (N = 78), explicit and implicit measures of attitudes towards organ donation, as well as behavioural commitment, were assessed. Implicit associations were measured by an Implicit Association Test; five constructs assessed self-reported—understood as reflected—attitude strength. The explicit attitude measure appeared to be the best single predictor of whether the participant ended up taking an organ donor card. More importantly, test results demonstrated the moderating role of attitude strength. In the case of low attitude strength, the likelihood of taking a donor card increased with an increasing positive implicit association. In contrast, increasing strength was associated with a weaker link between card taking and the implicit attitude measure. The results are discussed in light of the power of implicit associations to predict more deliberate behaviours.

Cite this paper
Hübner, G. , Mohs, A. and Petersen, L. (2014) The Role of Attitude Strength in Predicting Organ Donation Behaviour by Implicit and Explicit Attitude Measures. Open Journal of Medical Psychology, 3, 355-363. doi: 10.4236/ojmp.2014.35037.
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