JSS  Vol.2 No.9 , September 2014
A Comparison between Finland and China on Off-Campus Education of Primary and Secondary Schools
Author(s) Qi He1, Daoling Fu2
ABSTRACT
In 2011, the National Education Committee of Finland published “The Framework for Off-campus Education in Primary and Secondary Schools”, which stipulated the goals, content, and implementing guarantee of the off-campus education in primary and secondary schools. Besides, while emphasizing the equal importance of on-campus and off-campus education, the “Framework” also advocated schools to actively deal with the challenges posed to off-campus education, ensured its high quality and efficiency from all aspects, and cultivated primary and secondary school students’ emotional cognition, so as to enhance the level of their moral cognition. As a result, The “Framework” has profoundly promoted the development of off-campus education in Finnish primary and secondary schools. The off-campus education of china has certain problems relatively, such as the lack of system management, while quality is not guaranteed. However China has invested a lot of human, financial and material resources in basic education these years, and appropriate measures have been taken to address the problem of excessive burden on students. Moreover, much importance was attached to strengthening the construction and management of off-campus education sites, and enriching students’ extracurricular education. The author’s current study opted to compare Finland and China on Off-campus Education of Primary and Secondary Schools. Implications for Chinese education are discussed.

Cite this paper
He, Q. and Fu, D. (2014) A Comparison between Finland and China on Off-Campus Education of Primary and Secondary Schools. Open Journal of Social Sciences, 2, 321-327. doi: 10.4236/jss.2014.29051.
References
[1]   Central People’s Government of the People’s Republic of China. The National Medium-and Long Term Plan for Education Reform and Development (2010 to 2020).

[2]   The Finnish National Board of Education. Basic Education Act 1998 [EB/OL]. 2013-08-10.
http://www.minedu.fi/OPM/Koulutus/perusopetus/?lang=en.pdf

[3]   Chinese Youth Association, China Youth University for Political Sciences (2005) China Youth Education Policy Content Analysis and Performance Evaluation. China Children Press, Beijing, 52.

[4]   Itkonen, T. and Jahnukainen, M. (2007) An Analysis of Accountability Policies in Finland and the United States. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 54, 5-23.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10349120601149664

[5]   Nation Master. School Life Expectancy [EB/OL].
http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/edu_sch_lif_exp_tot-education-school-life-expectancy-total. 2013-09-15

[6]   Nation Master. Student Attitude Dislike School [EB/OL].
http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Education/Student-attitude/Report-class-disorder

[7]   Nation Master. Student Attitude, Find School Boring [EB/OL]. 2013-09-15.
http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/edu_stu_att_fin_sch_bor-student-attitude-find-school-boring

[8]   Finland Education Stats [EB/L].
http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Finland/Education

[9]   Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture. Education System in Finland [EB/OL]. 2013-08-12.
http://www.minedu.fi/OPM/Koulutus/koulutusjaerjestelmae/index.html?lang=en

[10]   The Finnish National Board of Education. National Framework for before- and after-School Activities in Basic Education [EB/OL].
http://www.oph.fi/english/sources_of_information/core_curricula_and_qualification_
requirements/before_and_after_school_activities.pdf.2013-08-11.


[11]   Lai, K.H. (1999) Civic Education: A Focus on Student Affairs Practice after Reunification. Educational Studies, 25, 205-215.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03055699997918

[12]   The Finnish National Board of Education. National Core Curriculum for Basic Education [EB/OL].
http://www.oph.fi/download/47673_core_curricula_basic_education_4.pdf . 2013-08-11.

[13]   Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture. Proudly Presents: Educational Support and Guidance [EB/OL]. 2013-08-23.
http://www.minedu.fi/OPM/Verkkouutiset/2012/09/special_education.html?lang=en

[14]   Joelkivitsuma and Kariruoho (2007) Excellence through special Education? Lessons from the Finnish School Reform. Review of Education, 53, 283-302.

[15]   Halinen, I. and Jarvinen, R. (2008) Towards Inclusive Education: The Case of FINLAND. Prospects, 38, 77-97.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11125-008-9061-2

[16]   Yuan, L.Q. (2007) An Analysis of the Reasons for the Success of Finland’s Basic Education. Primary & Secondary Schooling Abroad, 12, 36-39.

[17]   Ahonen, P. (2014) Administrative Research in a Neoinstitutionalist Perspective: Finland, Calling for Globalization, and the Rehabilitation of Public Administration. Administration & Society, 46, 747-774.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0095399712461911

[18]   Giskes, K., Kunst, A.E. and Benach, J. (2005) Trends in Smoking Behaviour between 1985 and 2000 in Nine European Countries by Education. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 59, 395-401.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2004.025684

[19]   Sahlberg, P.E. (2007) Education Policies for Raising Student Learning: The Finnish Approach. Journal of Education Policy, 22, 152.

[20]   Central People’s Government of the People’s Republic of China. The National Medium-and Long-Term Plan for Education Reform and Development (2010 to 2020).

[21]   Sahlberg, P.E. (2007) Education Policies for Raising Student Learning: The Finnish Approach. Journal of Education Policy, 22, 157.

 
 
Top