Back
 ALS  Vol.2 No.3 , July 2014
“I’ve Got the Pilot”: An Interpretation of Flight, a Film by John Gatins, Writer, and Robert Zemeckis, Director
Abstract: Robert Zemeckis’s recent film Flight, about a talented but flawed commercial airline pilot (played by Denzel Washington) is discussed on both the realistic and allegorical levels, showing the relationship between the contemporary plot and the fifteenth-century morality play, The Summoning of Everyman. Evidence for and against the different kinds of interpretation is identified and discussed. The film forces the main character to make a series of progressively more difficult and significant ethical decisions about drugs, alcohol, friends (true and false), lovers, and personal atonement that challenge him. The audience must make an interpretive decision between the possible levels of meaning.
Cite this paper: Ferster, J. and Weiser, P. (2014) “I’ve Got the Pilot”: An Interpretation of Flight, a Film by John Gatins, Writer, and Robert Zemeckis, Director. Advances in Literary Study, 2, 83-86. doi: 10.4236/als.2014.23013.
References

[1]   Anonymous (1993). Everyman. Last Checked 8 April 2014. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=cme;cc=cme;view=toc;idno=Everyman

[2]   Higgins, S. T., Rush, C. R., Hughes, J. R., Bickel, W. K., Lynn, M., & Capeless, M. A. (1992). Effects of Cocaine and Alcohol, Alone and in Combination, on Human Learning and Performance. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 58, 87-105.

[3]   Wolfe, T. (1979). The Right Stuff. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, New York.

 
 
Top