CE  Vol.5 No.13 , July 2014
Mobile-Learning Potential Effects on Teachers’ Initial Professional Development in Cameroon: Curriculum Perspective
Author(s) Eric Len-Kibinkiri*
ABSTRACT

This study examines the relationship between mobile-learning and teachers’ initial professional development in Cameroon, more specifically the relationship between access to telephone resources and teachers’ professional development, use of multimedia telephone and teachers’ professional development, mobile-learning environment and teachers’ professional development.The incessant penetration of mobile phones in schools, and the need for a teaching strategy that can help institutions address their learning problems motivated the researcher to carry out this study. In order to proceed, three hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. A survey of two hundred (200) student-teachers drawn from three (3) primary government teacher training colleges and three higher teacher training colleges was carried out. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test and mediated regression were used to analyse the research hypotheses. Findings revealed that m-learning has a significant influence on teachers’ initial professional development. Results further suggest that attitude towards learning with a multimedia telephone has a direct impact on teachers’ professional development. Based on these findings, recommendations are made to teacher education institutions and education stake-holders to develop a positive attitude towards m-learning, redefined their interaction strategies, above all, adopt teaching and learning strategies that are innovative, dynamic and multidimensional.


Cite this paper
Len-Kibinkiri, E. (2014) Mobile-Learning Potential Effects on Teachers’ Initial Professional Development in Cameroon: Curriculum Perspective. Creative Education, 5, 1170-1180. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.513132.
References
[1]   Bakari, J. K., Ishaq, M. A., Miyedu, C., Nykvist, B., & Deutschmann, M. (2009). Enhancement of In-Service Teachers Training Programme through Mobile Phones in Tanzania. eLearning Africa 2009: 4th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training, 17-19.

[2]   Crook, C. (2001). The Social Character of Knowing and Learning: Implications of Cultural Psychology for Educational Technology. Journal of Information Technology for Teacher Education, 10, 19-36.

[3]   Jimenez, E., Kiso, N., & Ridao-Cano, C. (2007). Educational Second Chances for Youth. Development Outreach, 9, 20-21.

[4]   Latchem, C. (2012). Quality Assurance Tolkit for Open and Distance Non-Formal Education.

[5]   Ministry of Economy, Planning and Regional Development (2009). Cameroon Vision 2035.

[6]   Rwagasana, G., & Stucki, P. (2009). Strategic options and Results of Introducing Blended Learning at the National University of Rwanda. eLearning Africa 2009: 4th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training, 66-69.

[7]   Tchombe, T. M. (2004). Psychological Parameters in Teaching. Yaoundé: Presses Universitaires d Afrique.

[8]   The Constitution of the Republic of Cameroon (1996). Law Number 96-06 of 18th January 1996.

[9]   The Law of Orientation of Education in Cameroon (1998). Law Number 98/004 of 14th April 1998: To Lay down Guidelines on Education in Cameroon.

[10]   Traxler, J., & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2005). Mobile Learning in Developing Countries.

[11]   Tu, C.-H. (2000). On-Line Learning Migration: From Social Learning Theory to Social Presence Theory in a CMC Environment. Journal of Network and Computer Application, 23, 27-37.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/jnca.1999.0099

[12]   UNESCO and UNICEF (2012). EFA GOAL 6: Quality Education. Bangkok: UNESCO, UNICEF EAPRO and UNICEF ROSA.

[13]   World Bank (2006). From Schooling Access to Learning Outcomes: An Unfinished Agenda. Washington D.C.: The World Bank.

 
 
Top