OJCE  Vol.4 No.2 , June 2014
Microclimatic Factors Effect on Productivity of Construction Industry
Author(s) Hatim A. Rashid*
ABSTRACT

It is apparent that heat can hamper timing and productivity of construction work that occurs outside. There are many types of construction changes and each type can have an effect on labor and machinery productivity. But what is the effect of extreme heat & humidity and dust storm on construction industry can occur either indoor or outdoor work. Construction materials production data from main four companies in the Gulf region over five years period were collected. This study found that the adverse sever summer climate of heat and dust storms lead to a significant reduction in production. An average of week with six days during summers of heat exceeding 46C with high humidity reduces production in the week by 10% on average. A cross the regional companies, severe weather reduce production on average by 7% and delay the deliveries date. While it is possible that companies are able to recover these losses at some later date of summers. Further, even if recovery does occur at some point at very least these shocks are costly as they increase the volatility of production. Also this study concludes useful results for assessing the potential productivity shock associate with inclement weather as well as guiding managers on where to locate a new production facility. We recommend developing of empirical model for Heat Prediction in the region to expect to become more relevant as climate severity and frequent of severe weather.


Cite this paper
Rashid, H. (2014) Microclimatic Factors Effect on Productivity of Construction Industry. Open Journal of Civil Engineering, 4, 173-180. doi: 10.4236/ojce.2014.42015.
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