OJCE  Vol.4 No.2 , June 2014
Transit Bus and Pedestrian Safety Analysis in the Context of Operator Improvements and Traffic Volume Assessment
Author(s) Seri Park*, Vanvi Trieu
ABSTRACT
Pedestrian safety related to public bus transit is an integral part of promoting sustainability especially in the urban setting. This concept has received significant attention within the last decade as transit agencies strive to make their systems more sustainable and safer at the same time. This study examined pedestrian collisions related to public transit buses in Philadelphia over a three-year study period from 2008 to 2011. The objective is to perform a detailed analysis on crash records, which provides the foundation on statistics for bus-pedestrian collision to allow for future studies in modeling work in this field. Results of this research provided insights on bus-pedestrian collisions in terms of bus maneuver, cause of crash, impact point of bus, and relation to hourly traffic volume. A strong correlation was found between traffic volume and bus-pedestrian collision rate in terms of hours of the day. For any given hour, an increase in collision frequency was found if the traffic volume exceeds a threshold of 5% of its average annual daily traffic. This serves as an indicator of locations that pedestrians are vulnerable at. Analyses were conducted to the fullest extent allowable by the limited dataset. This study presents findings that can be future developed and investigated in future studies. Additionally, countermeasures are recommended in each section that presents a critical area to address.

Cite this paper
Park, S. and Trieu, V. (2014) Transit Bus and Pedestrian Safety Analysis in the Context of Operator Improvements and Traffic Volume Assessment. Open Journal of Civil Engineering, 4, 147-158. doi: 10.4236/ojce.2014.42013.
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