CE  Vol.5 No.8 , May 2014
The Effectiveness of a Project Manager for Risk Management in a Career Education Project
Author(s) Kazutsune Moriya
ABSTRACT


As a framework for the effort to develop perspectives for work and promote autonomous career development among young people, schools at all levels—from elementary schools to universities—are introducing and conducting career education. One result of these efforts has been that career education, which is supposed to be conducted systematically while maintaining a certain level of quality, is currently not functioning well. More specifically, the wide range of career education curricula and the fact that the method of execution is completely up to each teacher has led to inconsistent quality and a range of risks. To help address this, and given that career education itself constitutes a project towards achieving the education goals, this paper argues that using a project manager in career education—a role that has been entirely left up to each teacher to fill or provide—is effective in managing the risks involved in career education projects and proactively providing countermeasures to offset these risks.



Cite this paper
Moriya, K. (2014) The Effectiveness of a Project Manager for Risk Management in a Career Education Project. Creative Education, 5, 525-532. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.58062.
References
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