CE  Vol.5 No.7 , April 2014
UNESCO Inclusion Policy and the Education of School Students with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities:Where to Now?
ABSTRACT

The education of school students with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities presents diverse challenges to practitioners, families and policymakers. These challenges are philosophically and ethically complex, and impact curriculum, assessment and pedagogy. Given the international ascendancy of both the UNESCO Policy Guidelines on inclusion in education and the principles of inclusion for people with disabilities with respect to human services policy and practice, the authors build on their previous work to advocate for renewed debate about the nature of school education for these students, and put forward four pathways to inform this debate.


Cite this paper
Lyons, G. and Arthur-Kelly, M. (2014) UNESCO Inclusion Policy and the Education of School Students with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities:Where to Now?. Creative Education, 5, 445-456. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.57054.
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