Health  Vol.3 No.3 , March 2011
Effects of water flow volume on the isolation of bacteria from motion sensor faucets
ABSTRACT
Water outlets for washing hands and medical equipment are essential for preventing hospital infection. The present study clarified the effects of water flow volume on the identification and quantitative evaluation of bacteria found around spouts in the 17 hand-washing stations. Pseu-domonas aeruginosa was detected from 4 sta-tions before adjustment and 2 after adjustment. Although no significant difference was identified in the detection rate of P. aeruginosa (p = 0.368), when combining P. aeruginosa and glucose non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (NFB), the number of stations with P. aeruginosa and/or NFB decreased significantly from 15 before adjustment to 9 after adjustment (p = 0.023). Before adjust-ment, quantity of bacteria was “2+” for 3 stations and “1+” for 7 stations, but was “1+” for 3 stations and “2+” for 0 stations after adjustment. These results show that quantity of bacteria could be reduced from spouts by adjusting flow volume. These results were also supported by experiments for cleanliness using Adenosine 5’-triphosphate bioluminescence me- thod.

Cite this paper
nullNakamura, Y. , Watanabe, M. , Kubo, E. , Suzuki, A. , Igari, H. , Kitada, M. and Sato, T. (2011) Effects of water flow volume on the isolation of bacteria from motion sensor faucets. Health, 3, 146-150. doi: 10.4236/health.2011.33027.
References
[1]   Aumeran, C., Paillard, C., Robin, F., Kanold, J., Baud, O., Bonnet, R., Souweine, B. and Traore, O. (2007) Pseu-domonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida outbreak associated with contaminated water outlets in an onco-haematology paediatric unit. Journal of Hospital Infec-tion, 65, 47-53. doi:10.1016/j.jhin.2006.08.009

[2]   Kolmos, H.J., Thuesen, B., Nielsen, S.V., Lohmann, M., Kristffersen, K. and Rosdahl, V.T. (1993) Outbreak of infection in a burnsunit due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa originating from contaminated tubing used for irrigation of patients. Journal of Hospital Infection, 24, 11-21. doi:10.1016/0195-6701(93)90085-E

[3]   Ferroni, A., Nguyen, L., Pron, B., Quesne, G., Brusset, M.C. and Berche, P. (1998) Outbreak of nosocomial uri-nary tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a paediatric surgical unit associated with tap-water con-tamination. Journal of Hospital Infection, 39, 301-307.

[4]   Bert, F., Maubec, E., Bruneau, B., Berry, P. and Lam-bert-Zechovsky, N. (1998) Multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa outbreak associated tap water in neurosurgery intensive care unit. Journal of Hospital Infection, 39, 53-62. doi:10.1016/S0195-6701(98)90243-2

[5]   CDC (1999) Guideline for the prevention of surgical site infection 1999. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol, 20, 247- 278.

[6]   Hasan, A., Utku, O. and Koray, K. (2006) Comparison of results of ATP bioluminescence and traditional hygiene swabbing methods for the determination of surface cleanliness at a hospital kitchen. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, 209, 203-206. doi:10.1016/j.ijheh.2005.09.007

[7]   Eickhoff, T.C. (1970) Microbiological sampling. Hospi-tals, 44, 86-87.

[8]   American Hospital Association Committee on Infections within the Hospitals (1974) Statement on microbiologic sampling in the hospital. Hospitals, 48, 125-126.

[9]   Garner, J.S. and Favero, M.S. (1986) CDC guideline for handwashing and hospital environment control. Infection Control, 7, 231-243.

[10]   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HIC- PAC) (2001) Draft guideline for environmental infection control in healthcare facilities, 78-87.

[11]   Rutala, W.A. and Weber, D.J. (2001) Surface disinfec-tion: should we do it? Journal of Hospital Infection, 48, S64-S68. doi:10.1016/S0195-6701(01)90017-9

[12]   Engelhart, S., Krizek, L., Glasmacher, A., Fischnaller, E., Marklein, G. and Exner, M. (2002) Pseudomonas aeru- ginosa outbreak in a haematology-oncology unit associ-ated with contaminated surface cleaning equipment. Journal of Hospital Infection, 52, 93-98. doi:10.1053/jhin.2002.1279

[13]   Widmer, A.F., Wenzel, R.P., Trilla, A., Bale, M.J., Jones, R.N. and Doebbeling, B.N. (1993) Outbreak of Pseudo- monas aeruginosa infections in a surgical intensive care unit: probable transmissionvia hands of a health care worker. Clinical Infectious Disease, 16, 372-376.

[14]   Kolmos, H.J., Thuesen, B., Nielsen, S.V., Lohmann, M., Kristoffersen, K. and Rosdahl, V.T. (1993) Outbreak of infection in a burnsunit due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa originating from contaminated tubing used for irrigation of patients. Journal of Hospital Infection, 24, 11-21. doi:10.1016/0195-6701(93)90085-E

 
 
Top