JGIS  Vol.6 No.1 , February 2014
Spatial Risk Analysis of Water Borne Diseases (Bovine Leptospirosis) in the Rive Nile State-Sudan
ABSTRACT

Geographical Information Science (GIS) technologies have been used increasingly for ecology and epidemiology of water-borne diseases, providing approach for animal health issues. This study was set up to investigate the geographical distribution of Bovine that was affected by Leptospira hardijo, in River Nile state, on October 2012. Locations of targeted cattle were delimited using GPS. Fifty three (53) of blood samples were collected, and screened in the laboratory for Leptospira hardijo specific antibodies using indirect ELISA. 15.09% had evidence of infection as determined by the presence of anti-leptospira antibodies. It was inferred that no incidences were recorded in 45 locations out of the 53 selected locations in the state. Leptospirosis risk area for transmission was mapped using 5 km buffer distance. Animals’ movements routes were mapped with their contacts area and positive samples locations, hafair locations where animals contacts were mapped. This study demonstrated the value of GIS and GPS in disease mapping for animals’ health, and this might help veterinary authorities to implement strategic interventions for animal disease control.



Cite this paper
R. Abass, M. Alla and A. El-Eragi, "Spatial Risk Analysis of Water Borne Diseases (Bovine Leptospirosis) in the Rive Nile State-Sudan," Journal of Geographic Information System, Vol. 6 No. 1, 2014, pp. 1-10. doi: 10.4236/jgis.2014.61001.
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