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 AJPS  Vol.5 No.1 , January 2014
Weed Management in Spring Planted Cereals with Mesotrione
Abstract: There is little information on the efficacy of mesotrione for the control of broadleaved weeds in spring planted cereals under Ontario environmental conditions. A total of eight studies were conducted in Ontario over a two-year period (2010 to 2011) to evaluate cereal tolerance and weed control efficacy of mesotrione applied preemergence (PRE) at 25, 50, 100, 140, and 280 g ai ha-1 in spring planted barley, durum wheat, oats, and wheat. Mesotrione, applied preemergence at the rates evaluated, caused no injury in either year in spring planted barley, durum wheat, oats, or wheat evaluated at 1, 2 and 4 week after emergence (WAE). The predicted mesotrione rate required to give adequate control of AMBEL, CHEAL, POLCO and SINAR was generally greater than 280 g ai ha-1. The average yield of the weedy check was 81% of the weed-free check. According to the exponential to maximum regression, the mesotrione rates required to give 90%, 95% and 98% of the weed-free check were 15, 30 and 45 g ai ha-1, respectively. To provide yield equivalent to the standard treatment of bromoxynil/MCPA, 36 g ai ha-1 of mesotrione was needed. Based on these results, mesotrione applied preemergence at 25, 50, 100, 140, and 280 g ai ha-1 can be safely used in spring planted barley, durum wheat, oats, and wheat. However, greater than 280 g ai ha-1 of mesotrione was needed to adequately control AMBEL, CHEAL, POLCO and SINAR.
Cite this paper: N. Soltani, C. Shropshire, T. Cowan and P. Sikkema, "Weed Management in Spring Planted Cereals with Mesotrione," American Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol. 5 No. 1, 2014, pp. 153-157. doi: 10.4236/ajps.2014.51020.
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