JGIS  Vol.5 No.6 , December 2013
Teaching Spatial Science Courses in Public Universities in Tanzania: Challenges and Opportunities
ABSTRACT

Spatial science courses that are Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) are increasingly growing into extremely important disciplines that accommodate various applications in wider sectors of development. Effective teaching and learning of the courses, however, requires intensive investment in facilities and human resources, since the technology is sophisticated and growing fast. This study aims at exploring the challenges of teaching and learning spatial science courses, RS and GIS, particularly in public universities in Tanzania. The study also identifies possible opportunities to improve the situation. Using social survey techniques in data gathering and analysis and author’s own experience, lack of resources, poor background to the courses, delivery methods, limited number of staff and large classes were seen to be the major obstacles in successful learning and teaching. Opportunities exist in using open source resources, collaboration with other institutions within and outside the country and for the universities to give due weight to the courses by building capacity of their staff and procuring facilities, especially laboratories equipments.

 


Cite this paper
E. Mwita, "Teaching Spatial Science Courses in Public Universities in Tanzania: Challenges and Opportunities," Journal of Geographic Information System, Vol. 5 No. 6, 2013, pp. 543-547. doi: 10.4236/jgis.2013.56051.
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