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 OJU  Vol.3 No.8 , December 2013
Determining the Utility of Pathologic Analysis of Ureteral Specimens Obtained from Repair of Vesicoureteral Reflux and Ureterovesical Junction Obstruction in Children: Potential for Physician-Initiated Cost-Reduction
Abstract: Purpose: Partial resection of the distal ureter is commonly performed during reconstructive surgery in pediatric urology; particularly for correction of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and ureterovesical junction obstruction (UVJO). Many hospitals require pathologic examination of all excised tissues. We examined the pathologic findings in such specimens to evaluate the utility of this practice. Methods: We reviewed the findings on pathologic examination of distal ureteral segments excised during surgical correction of VUR and UVJO in children by a single surgeon over a 13-year period. Results: One hundred and ninety-one specimens from 126 patients were reviewed. None were found to have any significant pathologic findings that impacted therapy. Conclusion: Routine pathological examination of distal ureteral segments excised during surgical correction of VUR and UVJO is not warranted. This presents potential for cost and resource reduction in care of these patients.
Cite this paper: U. Nseyo, M. Anderson and J. Wiener, "Determining the Utility of Pathologic Analysis of Ureteral Specimens Obtained from Repair of Vesicoureteral Reflux and Ureterovesical Junction Obstruction in Children: Potential for Physician-Initiated Cost-Reduction," Open Journal of Urology, Vol. 3 No. 8, 2013, pp. 304-307. doi: 10.4236/oju.2013.38057.
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