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 AID  Vol.3 No.4 , December 2013
Fatal Pulmonary Mycobacterium Celatum Infection in an Immunocompetent Patient. An Eight-Year Follow-Up of the First Case, a Review of the Literature and a Report of Beta-2 Microglobulin as a Potential Indicator of Disease Severity
Abstract: Setting: Swedish county hospital. Objective: Pulmonary M. celatum infection has been previously described only twice in an immunocompetent individual with no pre-existing chest disease. We describe the first Swedish case report of unusual drug-related complications and review the literature. Discussion: Atypical mycobacteriosis is often difficult to treat. We describe a fatal case of m celatum pneumonia in a previously healthy patient, unusual side effects encountered during her treatment and also the report of the utility of beta-2-microglobulin as a way to measure disease activity in mycobacterial infections. Conclusions: M. celatum may cause fatal pneumonia in previously healthy individuals. Treating the disease may be fraught with difficulty and there is a risk for very severe side effects, all of which must be weighed before taking the decision to treat this disease.  
Cite this paper: S. Rustscheff and J. Darelid, "Fatal Pulmonary Mycobacterium Celatum Infection in an Immunocompetent Patient. An Eight-Year Follow-Up of the First Case, a Review of the Literature and a Report of Beta-2 Microglobulin as a Potential Indicator of Disease Severity," Advances in Infectious Diseases, Vol. 3 No. 4, 2013, pp. 253-256. doi: 10.4236/aid.2013.34038.
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