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 Health  Vol.3 No.2 , February 2011
Assessment of the effectiveness of standardized infusion devices for healthcare management
Abstract: Since standardization is an important safety measure in healthcare systems, it is essential to systematically assess the effects of introducing new and increasingly complex medical equip-ment, such as infusion devices. In this study, we compared the effects of standardized polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-free closed-system integrated infusion devices with conventional infusion de-vices. Specifically, we assessed the safety, work efficiency, user-friendliness, and cost effec-tiveness of these devices. Compared with con-ventional infusion devices, integrated PVC-free infusion devices were more expensive to pur-chase and dispose, but were safer and more user-friendly and efficient. Although it would be preferable to use standardized infusion devices in all hospital departments, their cost may limit their application to departments that use high-risk treatments, where they would be most beneficial.
Cite this paper: nullSugita, S. , Aida, H. , Okada, A. and Kobayashi, H. (2011) Assessment of the effectiveness of standardized infusion devices for healthcare management. Health, 3, 93-98. doi: 10.4236/health.2011.32017.
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