MSA  Vol.2 No.1 , January 2011
Determination of the Pozzolanic Properties of Olotu Marine Clay and Its Potentials for Cement Production
ABSTRACT
The physical and chemical properties of marine clay at Olotu in Ilaje local government of Ondo State, Nigeria were investigated. Some of the physical properties investigated include plasticity index, linear shrinkage and firing characteristics (firing colour, shrinkage percentage, and water absorption capacity). The physical properties were determined using X-ray diffractometry method. The chemical composition was determined using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) method. All tests were carried out according to procedures specified by relevant British and American Standards. It was established that the physical and chemical properties were adequate to qualify it as pozzolanic material for cement production when compared with other pozzolanic materials and measured against relevant standards. The cement produced was tested for compressive strength and setting times and the results confirmed the appropriateness of the use of the clay as a pozzolana.

Cite this paper
nullJ. Akande, C. Arum and F. Omosogbe, "Determination of the Pozzolanic Properties of Olotu Marine Clay and Its Potentials for Cement Production," Materials Sciences and Applications, Vol. 2 No. 1, 2011, pp. 53-58. doi: 10.4236/msa.2011.21008.
References
[1]   Annon, “Pozzolana,” 2010. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Pozzolana.

[2]   J. M. Akande and A. D. Bida, “Concentration Methods of Major Portar Kaoline Deposit, Plateau State”, International Journal in Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2006, pp. 192-199.

[3]   A. A. Hammond, “Manufacture and Use of Lime and Alternative Cements in Africa,” In: N. Hill, F. Holmes and D. Mather, Eds., Lime and Other Alternative Cements, Intermediate Technology Publication Ltd., London, 1992, pp. 35-45.

[4]   W. B. Balu, “Research on Development of Alternative Cements Based on Lime Pozzolanas in Uganda for Use in Rural Housing,” In: N. Hill, F. Holmer and D. Mather, Eds., Lime and Other Alternative Cements, Intermediate Technology Publication Ltd., London, 1992, pp. 105-118.

[5]   P. H. Nalk, “KVIC Technology in the Production of Lime and Alternative Cements in India,” In: N. Hill, F. Holmes and D. Mather, Eds., Lime and Other Alternative Cements, Intermediate Technology Publication Ltd., London, 1992, pp. 180-186.

[6]   BS 1881: “Testing Concrete, Part 131: Methods for Testing Cement in a Reference Concrete,” England.

[7]   I. N. Ogbukagu, “Properties and Beneficiation of Argillaceous Rocks of Southern Nigerian Sedimentary Basin,” Journal of Mining and Geology, Vol. 19, No. 2, 1982, pp. 43-51.

[8]   G. Enuvie, J. O. Akpokodje and B. N. Olorunfemi, “The Composition and Physical Properties of Some Ceramic and Pottery Clays of South Eastern Nigeria,” Journal of Mining and Geology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1991, pp. 1-6.

[9]   J. W. Herath, “Lime industry in Sri Lanka,” In: N. Hill, F. Holmes and D. Mather, Eds., Lime and Other Alternative Cements, Intermediate Technology Publication Ltd., London, 1992, pp. 65-68.

[10]   G. C. Bye, “Portland Cement Composition, Production and Properties,” A. Wheaton and Co. Ltd., Exeter, 1983.

 
 
Top