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 OJMI  Vol.3 No.2 , June 2013
Nanoparticles Production and Inclusion in S. aureus Incubated with Polyurethane: An Electron Microscopy Analysis
Abstract: This study shows that submicron/nanoparticles found in bacterial cells (S. aureus) incubated with polyurethane (a material commonly used for prostheses in odontostomatology) are a consequence of biodestruction. The presence of polyurethane nanoparticles into bacterial vesicles suggests that the internalization process occurs through endocytosis. TEM and FIB/SEM are a suitable set of correlated instruments and techniques for this multi facet investigation: polyurethane particles influence the properties of S. aureus from the morpho-functional standpoint that may have undesirable effects on the human body. S. aureus and C. albicans are symbiotic microorganisms; it was observed that C. albicans has a similar interaction with polyurethane and an increment of the biodestruction capacity is expected by its mutual work with S. aureus.
Cite this paper: L. Didenko, G. Avtandilov, N. Shevlyagina, N. Shustrova, T. Smirnova, I. Lebedenko, R. Curia, C. Savoia, F. Tatti and M. Milani, "Nanoparticles Production and Inclusion in S. aureus Incubated with Polyurethane: An Electron Microscopy Analysis," Open Journal of Medical Imaging, Vol. 3 No. 2, 2013, pp. 69-73. doi: 10.4236/ojmi.2013.32010.
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