IJG  Vol.4 No.3 , May 2013
The Cyclic Behavior of Mountain Gravity Waves Generated by Flow over Topography
ABSTRACT

The cyclic behavior of lee wave systems, generated by stratified flow over mountains is investigated by the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model. The results show that, surface friction has a direct impact upon the number and timing of mountain gravity waves cycle generation. Cyclic generation of mountain lee waves and down-slope winds was found to be extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the surface drag coefficient, where mountain waves amplitude and intensity varies with the magnitude of the drag coefficient, and the interaction of mountain waves and boundary layer process determinates the wave characteristics. For the typical drag Cd = 10–3, surface friction promotes the formation of the stationary mountain lee waves and hydraulic jump, especially, promotes boundary layer separation, the generation of low-level turbulent zones and rotor circulation or reversal flow within boundary layer. When drag coefficient becomes Cd = 10–4, lee waves remain steady states and the first evolution cycle maintains much longer than that of Cd = 10–3. In the case of the highest drag coefficient Cd = 10–2, surface friction suppresses wave breaking and the onset of hydraulic jump, and reduces greatly the amplitude and intensity of lee waves and down slope wind.


Cite this paper
Z. Li, C. Chen and J. Liu, "The Cyclic Behavior of Mountain Gravity Waves Generated by Flow over Topography," International Journal of Geosciences, Vol. 4 No. 3, 2013, pp. 558-563. doi: 10.4236/ijg.2013.43051.
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