Health  Vol.2 No.11 , November 2010
Determinants of primary care physicians’ practice of prostate cancer counseling and screening
ABSTRACT
Objective: The objective was to examine practices of primary care physicians and its determinants towards prostate cancer screening. Methods: Data was obtained from 204 primary care physicians using self-reports of prostate cancer screening practices, knowledge, attitudes towards prostate cancer screening. Results: nearly half of the respondent (54.7%) were practicing counseling and referring prostate cancer patients. The mean correct knowledge score was 54.3%, their attitude was not strong; the only statement that nearly seventy percent of physicians agreed upon was about the value of screening, however, the reliability and evidence to support DRE & PSA were in question. Knowledge and attitude were found to be the most significant predictors that determine physicians’ self practice. Conclusion: Background information and attitudes are important determinants of physicians’ practice behavior towards prostate cancer counseling and referral in our study.

Cite this paper
nullRabah, D. and Arafa, M. (2010) Determinants of primary care physicians’ practice of prostate cancer counseling and screening. Health, 2, 1312-1315. doi: 10.4236/health.2010.211195.
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