PSYCH  Vol.1 No.4 , October 2010
The Mediating Role of Procedural Justice between Participation in Decision-Making and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: An Empirical Study about Skeleton Government Civilian in China
ABSTRACT
Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is very important for organization to adapt changing external conditions. Numerous researches have found that the stable relationship between participation in decision-making (PD) and procedural justice (PJ), between PJ and OCB. This study examined the mediating effect of PJ on the relationship between PD and OCB. Data collected from 288 civilian from skeleton government in Hubei province of China indicated that: procedural justice perception mediates the relationship between participation in decision-making and one of two organizational citizenship behavior dimensions.

Cite this paper
nullZhang, G. , Lee, G. & Zou, X. (2010). The Mediating Role of Procedural Justice between Participation in Decision-Making and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: An Empirical Study about Skeleton Government Civilian in China. Psychology, 1, 300-304. doi: 10.4236/psych.2010.14039.
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