PSYCH  Vol.4 No.3 A , March 2013
Similarities and Differences between Adult and Child Learners as Participants in the Natural Learning Process
Author(s) Darlene McDonough*
ABSTRACT

This paper compares Brian Cambourne’s Conditions of Learning (1988), APA’s Learner-Centered Psychological Principles (1997), and Malcolm Knowles’ Adult Learning Theory (2011). These theories embrace the natural learning process and not the traditional view of learning. The traditional view suggests that the teacher has the knowledge, the learner is dependent on the teacher to disseminate the knowledge and the learner has nothing to contribute. In the natural learning process, knowledge is distributed in a circular and reciprocal way through a collaborative sharing of experiences, centered on real life situations, and learners are responsible for their own learning. In the 21st century knowledge is constantly changing and expanding exponentially. The natural learning process facilitates the life-long learning that is needed to remain a valuable contributor in society where learning has become a collaborative experience.


Cite this paper
McDonough, D. (2013). Similarities and Differences between Adult and Child Learners as Participants in the Natural Learning Process. Psychology, 4, 345-348. doi: 10.4236/psych.2013.43A050.
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