GSC  Vol.3 No.1 , February 2013
Direct Preparation of Hydrogen and Carbon Nanotubes by Microwave Plasma Decomposition of Methane over Fe/Si Activated by Biased Hydrogen Plasma
ABSTRACT

Methane was decomposed to hydrogen and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave plasma, using Fe/Si catalyst activated by biased (150 V) hydrogen plasma for various treatment times. Upon exposure to biased hydrogen plasma, the catalyst surface becomes lumpy within 1 min, coheres between 5 and 10 min and forms particles after 20 min. The methane conversion increased up to 93% over the treatment time of 5 min. The hydrogen yield showed as similar tendency as the methane conversion and kept 83% at treatment time of 5 min. The treatment time up to 1 min increased the amount of deposited carbon, and after treatment time of 5 min it dropped; then again after treatment time of 20 min, it increased to reach a maximum value of 22 gc/gcat. Deposited carbon was found to be consisted of carbon nanotubes. It grew vertically on the catalyst surface and reached a maximum length of 30.7 nm after treatment time of 10 min. Multiple types of CNTs were present, and the CNT diameters decreased with increasing plasma treatment time.


Cite this paper
K. Konno, K. Onoe, Y. Takiguchi and T. Yamaguchi, "Direct Preparation of Hydrogen and Carbon Nanotubes by Microwave Plasma Decomposition of Methane over Fe/Si Activated by Biased Hydrogen Plasma," Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Vol. 3 No. 1, 2013, pp. 19-25. doi: 10.4236/gsc.2013.31004.
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