SM  Vol.3 No.1 , January 2013
Predictors of Electoral Participation among Spanish and Latin American Undergraduates
ABSTRACT

This paper presents the results of a study of 709 undergraduates in Nicaragua, El Salvador, Chile, and Spain, countries with different developmental levels that held the first free elections following their respective dictatorships within a thirteen year span. The paper analyzes the electoral participation of undergraduates in relation to different factors. Results show a high electoral participation among Salvadoran, Nicaraguan, and Spanish undergraduates, while low turnout is observed among Chileans. The best predictors of electoral participation of undergraduates are related to their nationality, economic status, interest in politics, gender or living away from home.


Cite this paper
Vázquez, J. , Panadero, S. & García-Varela, A. (2013). Predictors of Electoral Participation among Spanish and Latin American Undergraduates. Sociology Mind, 3, 56-61. doi: 10.4236/sm.2013.31010.
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