CE  Vol.3 No.8 B , December 2012
Enhancing Pre-service Teacher’s Self-efficacy and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Designing Digital Media with Self-regulated Learning Instructional Support in Online Project-based Learning
ABSTRACT
This study investigated pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy in designing digital media and their technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) for designing digital media using different forms of self- regulated learning instructional support for online project-based learning. The study used a 2x2 factorial research design. The sample consisted of 232 pre-service teachers from an institution situated in Bangkok, Thailand. The four different forms of self-regulated learning instructional support for online project-based learning were PB+SQ+PA, PB+SQonly, PB+PAonly, and PBonly. Two-way Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was used for data analysis. The results showed significant differences in pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy and TPCK posttest scores. No main effect was found between two different self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA) upon the means of self-efficacy in designing digital media scores and TPCK scores. The self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA) had a statistically significant interaction upon the means of self-efficacy in designing digital media scores while the self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA) had no interaction upon the means of the TPCK scores.

Cite this paper
Tantrarungroj, P. & Suwannatthachote, P. (2012). Enhancing Pre-service Teacher’s Self-efficacy and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Designing Digital Media with Self-regulated Learning Instructional Support in Online Project-based Learning. Creative Education, 3, 77-81. doi: 10.4236/ce.2012.38B017.
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