CE  Vol.4 No.1 , January 2013
Students’ Interaction and Its Relationship to Their Actions and Verbalized Knowledge during Chemistry Labwork
ABSTRACT
The present study focuses on the interaction of students during chemistry labwork and investigates its relationship with students’ actions that are related to the context of labwork and verbalized knowledge expressed by them. At first, labguides for chemistry labwork were designed and were implemented in three groups of 16-year-old students. The labwork process was videoed in each group of students. Each part of the half-minute videos was analyzed. The analysis identified the types of students’ interaction, the categories of their actions that are related to the context of labwork and the categories of their verbalized knowledge throughout the labwork. It emerged that there is a relationship among the types of students’ interaction, the categories of their verbalized knowledge and the categories of their actions that are related to the context of labwork. The results of this study affect the designing of labwork activities so that they can become more effective.

Cite this paper
Skoumios, M. & Passalis, N. (2013). Students’ Interaction and Its Relationship to Their Actions and Verbalized Knowledge during Chemistry Labwork. Creative Education, 4, 1-8. doi: 10.4236/ce.2013.41001.
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