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 OJMC  Vol.2 No.3 , September 2012
Microwave Assisted and Al2O3/K2CO3 Catalyzed Synthesis of Azetidin-2-One Derivatives Containing Aryl Sulfonate Moiety with Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Microbial Activity
Abstract: We report the novel synthesis of azetidin-2-one derivatives containing aryl sulfonate moiety from the reaction of 2-hydroxy benzaldehyde with p-toluene sulfonyl chloride afforded firstly 2-formylphenyl 4-methylbenzene sulfonate (2). The compound (2) on reaction with p-aminobenzoic acid or 2-aminopyridine gave the corresponding aldimines (3). Furthermore, the aldimines are on reaction with chloroacetyl chloride gives corresponding azetidin-2-ones in good to moderate yield. Among the eight synthesized azetidin-2-ones, five selected compounds have been screened for the an-ti-inflammatory activity, few of them showed good anti-inflammatory activity compared with standard drugs. Anti- microbial activity of all synthesized compounds has been tested and most of the compounds showed good anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities.
Cite this paper: nullB. Kendre, M. Landge and S. Bhusare, "Microwave Assisted and Al2O3/K2CO3 Catalyzed Synthesis of Azetidin-2-One Derivatives Containing Aryl Sulfonate Moiety with Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Microbial Activity," Open Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 2 No. 3, 2012, pp. 98-104. doi: 10.4236/ojmc.2012.23012.
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