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 JASMI  Vol.2 No.2 , June 2012
Textile Environmental Conditioning: Effect of Relative Humidity Variation on the Tensile Properties of Different Fabrics
Abstract: With the aim that to confirm the need for humidity control in the environment in which textile sample are visually and instrumentally analyzed, three different pre-conditioned fabrics sample of cotton, polyester and silk were treated at a fix temperature of 21?C. The relative humidity adjusted to four levels: 55%, 65%, 75% and 85% RH for a conditioning time of 24 hours as specified in ASTM D-1776-98. It has been observed that as the relative humidity increase from 55% to 85% cotton increase its tensile strength, silk losses its strength and there was no significant change observed in the tensile strength of polyester fabric.
Cite this paper: M. Iqbal, M. Sohail, A. Ahmed, K. Ahmed, A. Moiz and K. Ahmed, "Textile Environmental Conditioning: Effect of Relative Humidity Variation on the Tensile Properties of Different Fabrics," Journal of Analytical Sciences, Methods and Instrumentation, Vol. 2 No. 2, 2012, pp. 92-97. doi: 10.4236/jasmi.2012.22017.
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