JASMI  Vol.2 No.2 , June 2012
Textile Environmental Conditioning: Effect of Relative Humidity Variation on the Tensile Properties of Different Fabrics
ABSTRACT
With the aim that to confirm the need for humidity control in the environment in which textile sample are visually and instrumentally analyzed, three different pre-conditioned fabrics sample of cotton, polyester and silk were treated at a fix temperature of 21?C. The relative humidity adjusted to four levels: 55%, 65%, 75% and 85% RH for a conditioning time of 24 hours as specified in ASTM D-1776-98. It has been observed that as the relative humidity increase from 55% to 85% cotton increase its tensile strength, silk losses its strength and there was no significant change observed in the tensile strength of polyester fabric.

Cite this paper
M. Iqbal, M. Sohail, A. Ahmed, K. Ahmed, A. Moiz and K. Ahmed, "Textile Environmental Conditioning: Effect of Relative Humidity Variation on the Tensile Properties of Different Fabrics," Journal of Analytical Sciences, Methods and Instrumentation, Vol. 2 No. 2, 2012, pp. 92-97. doi: 10.4236/jasmi.2012.22017.
References
[1]   B. P. Saville, “Physical Testing of Textile,” 1st Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1999.

[2]   J. E. Booth, “Principal of Textile Testing,” 3rd Edition, Chemical Publishing Corporation, Michigan, 1984.

[3]   K. Craven Brown, J. Cameron Mann and F. Thomas Peirce, “The Influence of Humidity on the Elastic Properties of Cotton part-V, The Tensile Behavior,” The Journal of Textile Institute, Vol. 21, No. 4, 1930, pp. 186-204.

[4]   J. E. Booth, “Principal of Textile Testing,” 3rd Edition, Chemical Publishing Corporation, Michigan, 1984.

[5]   ASTM D-1776, Textile Standard Atmosphere for Conditioning and Testing, 1998.

[6]   J. E. Mclntyre, “Textile Terms & Definition,” 10th Edition, Textile Institute, Manchester, 1990.

[7]   ISO-13934-1, “Tensile Properties of Fabric-part-1, Determination of Maximum Force and Elongation using Strip Method,” 1999.

[8]   ISO-3801, “Determination of Mass per unit Length and Mass per unit Area,” 1977.

[9]   ISO-7211-2, “Determination of number of threads per unit length,” 1984.

[10]   R. Meredlth, “Moisture in Textile,” 1st Edition, Textile Book Publication, New York, 1960.

[11]   T. P .Nevell and S. H. Zeronian, “Cellulose Chemistry and its Applications,” Ellis Horwood, Chichester, UK, 1985.

[12]   E. P. Gohl, “Textile Science,” An explanation to the fiber properties,” 2nd Edition, Longman Cheshire, Melbourne, 1993.

[13]   O. Ahumada, M. Cocca and G. Gentile, “Uniaxial tensile properties of yarns: Effects of moisture level on the shape of stress-strain curves,” Textile Research Journal, Vol. 74, No. 11, 2004, pp. 1001-1006. doi:10.1177/004051750407401111

[14]   E. P. Gohl, “Textile Science, An explanation to the fiber properties,” 2nd Edition, Longman Cheshire, Melbourne, 1993.

[15]   R. W. Moncrieff, “Man-made Fibers,” 6th Edition, Newnes-Butterworths, U.K, 1975.

[16]   J. F. Fuzek, “Absorption and Desorption of Water by Some Common Fibers,” Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Product and Research Development, Vol. 24, No. 14, 1985, pp. 140-144. doi:10.1021/i300017a026

[17]   X. W. Chen, J. Q. Fu., W. Z. Li and X. S. Gao, “Moisture Absorption and release performance of Fabrics,” Journal of Clothing Technology, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2005, pp. 48-56

[18]   B. P. Saville, “Physical Testing of Textile,” 1st Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1999.

[19]   A. Barbra, “Environmental Monitoring and Control,” 1991. http://cool.conservation-us.org/bytopic/environment/index.html

 
 
Top