IJCM  Vol.3 No.3 , May 2012
The Risk of Cesarean Delivery in Short Saudi Women
ABSTRACT
Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between maternal height of <155 cm and the risk of caesarean delivery due to failure to progress (FTP) among nulliparous saudi women. Design: Observational cohort study. Material and Method: A total of 405 term (GA > 37 weeks), uncomplicated singleton nulliparous pregnant women were enrolled on admission to labour room. The patients were divided into two groups based on maternal height, >155 cm (247 cases) as control and < 155 cm (158 cases) as study group. The medical records of these women were reviewed. Various baseline clinical characteristics were collected. Maternal characteristics and maternal and neonatal outcomes were recorded. Results: Caesarean section rate for all indications was higher among study group than control group (26.6% and 19.4% respec-tively, p = 0.023). Significant difference was observed in the rate of caesarean delivery due to failure to progress (7.3% and 12% in control and study group respectively, p-value 0.038). The rate of caesarean delivery due to failure to progress was highest among those with height 150 - 155 cm (p-value 0.022). Mean birth weight was significantly higher among control group than study group (3137 ± 403 g and 3030 ± 408 respectively, p-value 0.010). Conclusion: Term singleton nulliparous Saudi pregnant women with maternal height 151 - 154 cm were associated with a greater likelih-ood of caesarean section for failure to progress. Women with height <150 cm did not have increased cesarean section rate. However, mean birth weight was significantly lower in this group.

Cite this paper
N. H. Al Qahtani, S. Al Ganmi and A. Badran, "The Risk of Cesarean Delivery in Short Saudi Women," International Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol. 3 No. 3, 2012, pp. 238-241. doi: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.33048.
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