OJOph  Vol.2 No.2 , May 2012
Vision Screening in the Pediatrician’s Office
ABSTRACT
Objective: To assess current practices, attitudes, and perceived barriers toward pediatric vision screening. Patients and Methods: A link to a 9-question survey was electronically distributed to a national sample of 6000 pediatricians through Medical Marketing Services Inc. Data were collected using Survey Monkey. Results: Email open rate was 11%; 37% of those who opened the email responded (225 respondents). Over ninety percent of respondents perform some type of vision screening at least yearly, although age at which screening began varied, with two thirds of respondents instituting formal vision screening after three years. Fifty eight percent of respondents were either extremely unsatisfied, unsatisfied or only somewhat satisfied with their current screening method. Preferred methods of screening and confidence of pediatricians in their ability to detect pathology varied for children under versus over age three. The least frequently used methods for all age groups were autorefraction and photoscreening. The most commonly reported barriers to screening were inadequate training (48%), time required for exam (42%), and inadequate reimbursement (32%). Conclusions: Perceived barriers to vision screening in the pediatrician office have been previously identified, and photoscreening and autorefraction have been identified as a possible means to circumvent them. In spite of the addition of new procedural codes, pediatricians continue to report similar barriers to screening.

Cite this paper
N. L. Couser, F. Q. Esmail and A. K. Hutchinson, "Vision Screening in the Pediatrician’s Office," Open Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 2 No. 2, 2012, pp. 9-13. doi: 10.4236/ojoph.2012.22003.
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